One thing I know I don’t like is to be in the point of view of a character when he or she dies. That decision by the author makes me foam at the mouth. Or maybe that’s the new artificial sweetener I’m using. Anyway, over the years many characters in many books have snuffed it. Sometimes even the bad guys. And it hasn’t always been fun.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle thought he could retire from the Sherlock Holmes racket by throwing our hero off the Reichenbach Falls. No one was happy about this, least of all Mr. Holmes. He not only returned to live a long life, he keeps coming back in movies and television. So do we count hims as a character who died or not? Well, we’ll toy with the zombie category and move on.

Speaking of TV and Movies, Joss Whedon. That’s all I have to say on that account. Next.

Wuthering Heights by Ellis Bell aka Emily Bronte features a heroine who kicks the bucket in the arms of the antihero. But that’s the movie version, and really, the book isn’t a romance so much as an allegory on surrendering to social pressures. I hear.

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon is a fun series of books. But outside of the main family, you never know who is going to die, who is going to stay dead, and who is going to turn out to be a cousin twice removed on the distaff side. Or your monkey’s uncle.

Uh. Here’s a chuckle, Forbes puts out a list of 15 richest Fictional Characters. Cute. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6PaBATUQo0

Well, whether your characters live or die, you want the audience to care about them. How do you do that? Watch and learn: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xt2PcwKHbxc

Have a great week, see you on Sunday.

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